Tag Archives: Eggs

Scientists say eating eggs for breakfast helps boost brain function

naturalnews.com
13 March 2019 Amy Goodrich


(Natural News) Many people see eggs as the villains of the grocery cooler. One moment nutritionists are touting them for their health benefits, and the next they’re saying they’re bad for us. This controversy comes from the general belief that eggs raise cholesterol which may lead to a heart disease.

Previous research has linked regular egg consumption to heart attacks, high blood pressure, and weight gain. Conditions that cause damage to the heart, arteries, or blood circulation are also known to increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

According to the American Heart Association, healthy adults should not consume more than 300 milligrams of cholesterol a day. One large egg has around 186 milligrams of cholesterol and a small egg around 141 milligrams. A new study from the University of Eastern Finland now shows that a relatively high intake of dietary cholesterol is not associated with a heightened risk of coronary heart disease — the world’s number one killer.

Many people believe eggs increase the risk of dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. The Finnish researchers, however, discovered that eating eggs on a daily basis may help boost brain functions.

Better brain performance

For their study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, the scientists analyzed the diets of nearly 2,500 men aged between 42 and 60 over a period of 22 years. At the start of the analysis, none of the participants were diagnosed with a memory disorder such as Alzheimer’s or dementia.

Of the 2,500 men, 337 developed a neurological condition at some point – with the majority suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. The authors of the study found that neither cholesterol nor egg intake was linked to a higher risk of developing dementia or Alzheimer’s.

Despite the general belief that dietary cholesterol has a modest impact on blood cholesterol levels, Professor Jyrki Virtanen, adjunct professor in nutritional epidemiology at the University of Eastern Finland Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition in Kuopio, said cholesterol and egg intake have not been associated with higher risk of heart disease.

He also added that it is assumed that dietary cholesterol has a greater impact on blood cholesterol levels among carriers of the APOE4 gene. However, Virtanen and his colleagues reported that even carriers of the APOE4 gene don’t seem to have anything to fear when it comes to eating eggs or any other form of dietary cholesterol.

Furthermore, the data also showed that regular consumption of eggs does not increase the risk of a memory disorder, not even in individuals who are predisposed. On the contrary, the researchers found that egg intake improved performance on neuropsychological tests of the frontal lobe and executive functioning.

The study was funded by the University of Eastern Finland, and Virtanen added that there was no funding from the egg industry.

Have no fear

While eggs have gained a bad reputation over the recent years, they are making their comeback to the health food aisle. As reported by the Daily Mail Online, one large egg packs around six grams of high-quality protein and decent levels of the antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin as well as vitamins E, D, and A.

While lutein may help prevent clogged arteries, vitamin E has been shown to reduce the risk of future heart attacks in people with an existing cardiovascular disease. Previously, U.S. scientists reported that there is no clear link between egg consumption and coronary heart disease. Also, recently published research found consuming just one egg a day may reduce the risk of stroke by 12 percent.

Sources include:

DailyMail.co.uk

Consumer.HealthDay.com

AJCN.Nutrition.org

LiveScience.com

Eggs are brain food: Study shows eggs improve infant brain development

Natural News
8 January 2018
Ralph Flores

Image: Eggs are brain food: Study shows eggs improve infant brain development

(Natural News) It turns out, eggs aren’t just good for you, it can also be good for babies too, according to researchers from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis. In the study, they discovered that introducing eggs to newborn children starting at six months resulted in higher blood centralizations of choline and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), as well as other biomarkers in choline pathways.

The study, Eggs Early in Complementary Feeding Increase Choline Pathway Biomarkers and DHA: A Randomized Controlled Trial in Ecuador, was published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Lead author Lora Iannotti of Brown School explained: “Eggs have been consumed throughout human history, but the full potential of this nutritionally complete food has yet to be recognized in many resource-poor settings around the world.”

Choline is a known essential nutrient. It functions in a variety of roles, ranging from cell structure to learning, and has been shown to help fend off liver disease, atherosclerosis, and potential neurological disorders. However, most people do not even meet the required intake of choline, despite its importance in the human body. Egg yolks are known to be the primary source of choline. DHA, on the other hand, is an omega-3 fatty acid that has been correlated with healthy aging and infant development, particularly with immune and neuronal functions. A deficiency in DHA later in life can increase the risk of coronary disease and cognitive degeneration. Aside from eggs, other sources of DHA are fish and fish oil products.

“Like milk or seeds, eggs are designed to support the early growth and development of an organism and are, therefore, dense in nutrient content,” according to Iannotti. “Eggs provide essential fatty acids, proteins, choline, vitamins A and B12, selenium and other critical nutrients at levels above or comparable to those found in other animal food products, but they are relatively more affordable.”

According to the study, eggs provide nutrients in a “food matrix” which enhances its absorption and digestion.

In 2015, a randomized, controlled trial was made by the team in Ecuador in 2015. Children aged six to nine months were randomly assigned to be fed with one egg every day for half a year. A control group was also selected and were not provided with eggs.

Earlier papers from the study demonstrated that early introduction of eggs in the diet enhanced linear growth and reduced instances of stunted growth among babies who were given eggs starting at six months.

Other benefits of eating eggs

Aside from choline, eggs are one of the most nutritious foods available. A single hard-boiled egg contains vitamins A, B2, B5, and B12, as well as folate, phosphorus, and selenium. These are also known to raise High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL), the “good” cholesterol that decreases the risk of heart disease, stroke, and other health problems. Studies have also shown that adequate consumption of eggs can prevent the likelihood of cataracts and macular degeneration, thanks to the antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin found in egg yolks.

Eggs are also high in animal protein and contain essential amino acids that our bodies need. This is particularly true for free-range eggs, which contain a significantly higher amount of omega-3 fatty acids. These reduce the level of triglycerides in the body, which is a known risk factor for heart disease. (Related: Why Organic Eggs are a Nutritious Superfood.)

Learn more about the nutritional benefits of eggs and other superfoods by visiting SuperFoods.news today.

 

Sources include:

Sciencedaily.com

NCBI.NLM.NIH.gov 1

NCBI.NLM.NIH.gov 2

Healthline.co