Category Archives: Self Sustaining

10 Ways You Can Recycle Plastic Food Bottles

Surviopedia.com
11 August 2016
Carmela Tyrell

Have you ever noticed that you seem to buy, and then throw out endless numbers of plastic food and beverage bottles?

From ketchup and mayonnaise to soda and water, plastic bottles are truly one of the most common sources of rubbish. Did you know the plastic bottle are also some of the most versatile things you can have for managing all kinds of prepping needs?

Have a look at just a few simple things you can do with plastic bottles to make your life easier now and navigate through a major crisis. You’ll start stockpiling plastic bottles when you’ll see these projects, so that you have a large reserve of them in time of need.

Tools to Have On Hand

Even though plastic bottles are exceptionally easy to work with, a few basic tools are very important to have onhand.

  • Scissors
  • Pointed objects such as knitting needles, awls, nails, etc
  • Knife
  • Paper punch
  • Stapler
  • Ruler, Paper, Compass, Protractor – for designing items that you will be making from the bottles.  A paper pattern is especially useful because you can always use it to make new items as old ones wear out.
  • Candle – for some projects, you will need to melt the plastic in order to create a perfect fit or to make a new form altogether.   When used with care, a candle can provide enough heat to soften or melt the plastic.
  • Non-flammable work surface –  molten, and even very soft plastic can stick to all kinds of surfaces and be difficult to remove.  Aluminum foil or other non-flammable materials can help you reduce the risk of starting an unwanted fire and also make clean up much easier.  Don’t forget that plastic can also generate sparks that can easily land on curtains or other flammable material.  Work in an area where you do not have to worry about sparks starting fires hours or even days after you completed your task.
  • Source of readily available water or fire extinguisher – if you are planning to heat plastic for any reason, keep water or a fire extinguisher on hand in case the fire gets out of control.

And here are the DIY projects to develop using plastic bottles:

1. Sieve/Strainer

Removing debris from water, cooking, and even watering houseplants all require some kind of sieve or strainer. Despite that, when your life turns upside down because of a short term or long term disaster, sieves and strainers may be the last things on your mind. Fortunately, you can make a good strainer by poking a few holes in a plastic bottle.

To make strainers with the most precise patterns and holes, start off by adding water to the bottle and letting it freeze. Do not put the cap back on the bottle or overfill it as this can cause the bottle to split from the expansion that occurs as water converts to ice.

Once you have a solidly frozen bottle to work with, use clamps or a vice to secure the bottle to your work table.  Now all you have to do is punch holes in the bottle with a nail or awl and then let the ice melt. After you empty the water out, you will have a perfectly good strainer for food, water, and anything else that will not interact with the plastic.

2. Water Purification and Filtration

There are at least three ways you can use plastic drinking bottles for water purification:

  • First, if you have a clear bottle, simply fill it with water and set it in the sun for a few hours. The UV rays from the sun will go right through the plastic and kill off any bacteria in the water. Just make sure that you do not let the water get too hot because this will cause the water to take on a plastic taste.  In addition, if the water gets hot enough to make steam, it can cause the bottle to burst.
  • Second – you can cut the bottle open and use it to layer various kinds of filtration medium. Charcoal, sand, and just about anything else can be layered in the bottle. Be sure to have a clean cup or some container ready and in position to catch the water after it drains through the filtration media.
  • Third – if you plan on using hydroponics for growing food and raising fish, it is very important to keep the water well filtered. You can make an aquarium filter of just about any size using old plastic drinking bottles. Even if you use simple media like charcoal and fiber floss, your aquaponics system will work better than if you have no form of filtration and aeration.

3. Bug Catcher

Have you ever noticed that mosquitoes, horse flies and other noxious flying insects seem to show up when you have the least amount of time or energy to deal with them? If so, then you probably already know that these insects will probably appear in droves during a crisis situation.

To make matters even worse, the Zika virus and many other dangerous diseases can be transmitted by these insects. In times when sanitation and waste removal systems will be either overtaxed or unavailable, it is more important than ever to know how to get rid of flying insects using non-chemical means.

You can use plastic bottles to make inexpensive, easy to maintain bug catchers that will work no matter where you put them. In fact, if you have a problem with insects right now, you can use these bug catchers to solve your problems. Click on the picture below to read our article on how to build this bug catcher!

4. Build Shelters

Surprisingly enough, there are dozens, if not more ways to use plastic bottles to build shelters.  You can fill them with sand or other materials that would normally be of little use, and then make a mud cement to form walls.

Some people also fill the bottles with water or other materials that make it easier to use passive heating or cooling methods. You can also use plastic bottles filled with water and bleach to create a basic light that will brighten up an interior room.

Plastic bottles can also be cut apart for roof materials and siding, or you can melt the plastic down and form it into more suitable tiles.

5. Leak Sealant

If you think insects are going to be a nuisance in the post crisis world, then you may be caught off guard by how many problems can be caused by leaks. When it comes to overlooked areas of prepping, you may not even be thinking about storing away extra PVC pipe or other items that may spring a leak at just the wrong moment.

As long as the pipes in question will not reach high temperatures, then you can fix these leaks easily enough with plastic bottles.  All you need to do is:

  • Cut a large enough patch from the plastic bottle to cover the area that is leaking.
  • Use a candle to presoften the patch as much as possible.
  • Wear heat protecting while you fit the plastic patch to the area that is leaking.
  • Carefully use the candle to heat the plastic patch until it fully adheres to the item that needs to be patched.  Be careful not to melt or burn the item that is being patched.
  • If you have any kind of crazy glue or other sealant that will bond the plastic to the leaking object, you can use that instead of heating up the plastic.

6. Container Garden Planters

As with building a shelter, there are endless ways to use plastic bottles for growing plants.  Here are just a few that every prepper should know about:

  • Vertical garden planters – use bottles in combination with walls and ladders to create gardens in just about any area.
  • Vertical garden wall planters – if you are already building a shelter out of plastic bottles, then you might just want to incorporate these solutions for creating a garden and also disguising your home. Who would think that a house lurks beneath a mess of wild grape vines, raspberry stickers, or even poison ivy?  Even better, you can combine these vertical plant walls with an internal layer of sand bags to make your carefully hidden home bullet proof.
  • Vertical Garden Towers – one of the best ways to grow herbs, onions, and garlic revolves around having many plants arranged in layers.  This is easy to achieve when you make some large holes in a soda bottle to that the plants can grow from holes at different levels in the container. If you have very limited space for growing indoors, a vertical garden tower may be the best way to go.
  • Self – Watering Planters – for carefree gardens indoors and outdoors.
  • Plastic Bottle Greenhouse – If you are more interested in conventional growing methods and need a greenhouse, you can use this design.  For improved temperature control, seal some of the  bottle pairs with heat from a candle so that the bottles will hold water.  Since water absorbs more heat than air, and lets it go more slowly, you can extend the growing season quite a bit using this design.

7. Drawer and Counter Organizers

Since plastic bottles come in all shapes and sizes, it is very easy to cut them down and use them as drawer and counter organizers.  If you want something a bit fancier, you can also make vertical storage trays for lightweight items.

For example, the tray system featured in the link below is perfect for storing paper clips, thumb tacks, and a number of other desktop items. This includes sticky notes and other reminders that need to be in a prominent place without taking covering up other important things.

If you need to store heavier items in each tray, it may help to use heavier washers at the bottom of each bottle.  For improved durability, it may also help to use cement in the base to reduce the risk of the stand tipping over.

Or, better yet, you can turn the base into something of a coin bank and let the weight of the coins act as an anchor for the stand.

8. Life Jacket

Life jackets and other important swimming gear are the kinds of “leisure” items that you may also forget during a crisis. Since plastic bottles float well, they also make excellent life vests.  Just make sure that you leave the caps on and do not poke holes in them.

There are many ways to join the bottles together to make a suitable vest.  In general, the more bottles you can join together, the more weight they will be able to float.  If you do not have rope available, you can use vines or anything else that will not fall apart in the water.

9. Boats and Rafts

Unless you have a large homestead with a private pond large enough for boating, chances are you do not have access to a boat that can be launched easily.

No matter whether you pay for docking at a local marina, or you must transport the boat on a trailer, it will be very difficult to manage all of this during a major disaster. Nevertheless, if you must travel across water, you won’t get very far without a boat or raft. You can build a boat or raft with plastic bottles and glue.

There are also many other materials you can incorporate into the frame in order to take advantage of the best of the materials you have on hand.

When making a boat or raft, you should be very careful about the kind of glue that you use. While many waterproof glues and epoxies will work fine in freshwater, they may not work well at all in marine or brackish water. It will also be to your advantage to use a rope or net system as part of the boat’s form so that the bottles have a better chance of staying together even if the glue fails.

10. Air Blowers and Vacuum Cleaners

In a world where electricity will be at a premium, you may still need air blowers or suction to accomplish some basic tasks. While you can still sweep the floor and get rid of cobwebs with a broom, there may still be times when a vacuum cleaner or air blower will be of immense benefit.

Here are some simple guides for making vacuum cleaners. The amount of suction produced will depend largely on the strength of the motor.

Also there more video on Survivopedia here the the link to the article

https://www.survivopedia.com/10-ways-you-can-recycle-plastic-food-bottles/

Before you throw out an empty beverage or food plastic bottle, take a look at your survival goals and the kinds of things you would like toe have onhand. From boats and vacuum cleaners to organizing tools, you can do far more than expected with plastic bottles.

Never underestimate the power of these simple “rubbish” items in situations where your life, and the lives of your loved ones depend on successfully innovating with whatever items you may have onhand. Give some of these ideas a try and you are sure to find plenty of cost efficient, effective ways to pursue prepping goals and perhaps even make your life in the pre-crisis world a bit easier.

Eco Liberty Conclusion: Survivopedia have some interesting DIY project that you can get involve with that. Plastic Pollution is a real environmental issue; recycling plastic is way to reduce them going to landfills and ending up in the sea. There also more ways to recycle plastic. Machine made to cut plastic into 5mm (1/5 inch) peaces so when the plastic peaces enter the machine that turn plastic peaces into 3D printing filament or made into plastic pellets for other uses.

the video above show machine that turn plastic into 3D printing filament

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Using pallets for your garden purposes

Just to find this idea on social media I decide to cover this; because pallets has many uses. accord to this below video on You Tube from Natural Ways

Having the skills to grow your food is going to essential especially with upcoming solar minimum which we might be already in. Because grow food in the solar minimum and cold periods is going to be much more difficult especially outdoor because growing season is going to be shorter. Hydroponics and vertical farms are going to be useful technology to help us thrive in solar minimum and cold periods in the future. Those who have little to no cash you can find pallets near by and use it to make your own raised bed to grow your own garden.

How to 3D Print with Recycled Trash! | Maddie Moate

On a “Trash Walk” in Bali, Greg and I learnt that plastic trash has a value and can be sold up the chain to be recycled into new plastics… BUT we also tried something a little different! Using the Precious Plastic open source machinery we attempt to turn trash into a trash-can, using bottle caps to make 100% recycled 3D printer filament?!

A Polarized World to Better Control the Population as Food Scarcity Begins

Eco Liberty conclusion: The real reason why I watch and post video on Eco Liberty relating the solar minimum because Adapt 2030 always post video to share very important information about the oncoming the solar minimum and why it will affect the global economy majority and will have great chance of a major food shortage on a global scale. That I often post videos from Adapt 2030 so you people can be informed about the oncoming solar minimum; because the Mainstream media will not cover it and to keep you in the dark by pushing that Man-made global warming garbage; telling you that Carbon Dioxide (plant food) as pollutant that is causing runway global warming which is not the case; Carbon Dioxide is plant food; plants will die without Carbon Dioxide. People; please give this video a thumbs up on You Tube if you haven’t subscribed to Adapt 2030 please Subscribe to that channel; to give David DuByne the praise and courage for the hard work he puts in to give you the very important information that Mainstream media will not cover.

4 Good reasons why you should give fermented foods a try

naturalnews.com
14 December 2018
Zoey Sky

(Natural News) If you’re new to fermented foods, you may have a hard time eating them, especially since some dishes can look and smell strange. However, if you give fermented foods a chance, you’ll find that there are many options out there for you. In fact, some fermented foods are not only delicious, but they are also good for your overall health.

Here are four reasons why you should start eating fermented foods.

Fermented foods are accessible

You may not realize it, but you’ve probably already eaten fermented foods.

Below are some examples of common fermented foods:

  • Cheeses (e.g., blue and feta cheese)
  • Pickles (must be made without vinegar)
  • Sourdough bread
  • Yogurt with live and active cultures

You can also try unique fermented foods like kefir and kombucha. Kefir is a dairy product that you can get in the refrigerated section at your grocery store. If you can’t handle dairy, you can drink coconut kefir. Since fermented foods often have a strong flavor, try to start drinking kefir by adding some to a smoothie.

Kombucha is a fermented and fizzy drink made from black tea. While kombucha can help boost your gut health, always check the label. Always buy kombucha with no or low added sugars.

Fermented foods are easy to make

If you’re on a budget or if you want to experiment with food, you can make your own fermented vegetables. The process is simple, and all you need is sea salt, water, and your favorite vegetable.

Fermented foods are good for digestion

The average American diet isn’t good for your gut health, especially since it can often contain a lot of processed foods that are very hard to digest. Eating fermented foods can improve your digestion and gut health since they contain good bacteria. (Related: Natto, a fermented food from Japan, has enzymes that help prevent heart attacks and blood clots.)

Fermented foods contain more nutrients

When a vegetable is fermented, its nutritional value increases. Fermentation also makes the nutrients easier to absorb since the process helps break down the structure of the vegetables.

Recipe for fermented vegetables

Below is a basic recipe for fermented vegetables that you can make at home. The recipe yields about a quart.

You can personalize this recipe by using your preferred seasonings and vegetables.

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups of the vegetables of your choice –washed and peeled (if desired), then cut into roughly evenly sized pieces
  • 4 cups chlorine-free water
  • 2 tablespoons sea salt
  • Seasonings of your choice

Tools:

  • Cheesecloth, paper coffee filter, or tea towel
  • Measuring cup
  • Small jar
  • Wide mouth jar

Instructions:

  1. Fill a clean, wide-mouth jar with the chopped vegetables but leave at least one-and-a-half inches of head space.
  2. Add your seasonings.
  3. In a one-quart liquid measuring cup, combine four cups of water with two tablespoons of sea salt. Mix until the salt dissolves.
  4. Pour the saltwater brine over the vegetables in the wide-mouth jar. Make sure to leave an inch of head space.
  5. Place a smaller, clean jar (or something heavy) inside the first jar so the vegetables are submerged below the brine.
  6. Cover the jars with something breathable. You can use a paper coffee filter with a rubber band to hold it in place. Alternatively, you can use several layers of cheesecloth or a tea towel. If you use a tight-fitting lid, you need to open the jar every day to let some of the gasses escape. Another option is to use a lid with an air-lock.
  7. Let the vegetables ferment on the counter for two to three days at around 70-75 F. Check the jar daily to see if the vegetables are staying below the brine. After several days, tiny bubbles should be forming at the top of the brine.
  8. Taste the vegetables after two to three days have passed. Once they reach a flavor that is to your liking, remove the weight then cover the jar tightly. You can refrigerate the fermented vegetables until you want to eat it.

Here are some fermented vegetable combinations that you can experiment with:

  • Beets, carrots, and fennel
  • Broccoli and cauliflower with basil, garlic, and oregano
  • Carrots with garlic and ginger
  • Carrots with red pepper flakes
  • Cauliflower with curry powder
  • Garlic with basil and oregano
  • Green beans with garlic and dill

You can serve the fermented vegetables as an appetizer or you can use it to garnish a sandwich or grilled meats.

Discover the many health benefits of eating fermented foods at Healing.news.

Sources include:

Organic fertilizer can be used to increase crop yield in plants grown in rotation

Natural News
13 November 2018
Janine Acero

(Natural News) A study published in the journal Biological Agriculture & Horticulture assessed soil nitrogen oxidation through field incubation, and analyzed the rate of nitrogen release by commercial fertilizers compared with farmyard manure compost.

For the study, a three-year organic crop rotation was set up in a field with sandy loam, with a cover crop of rye and vetch for green manure. In the first year, the researchers planted potato and lettuce, followed by Swiss chard and turnips in the second year, and Portuguese cabbage and carrots in the third year.

Nitrogen (N) mineralization was assessed by field incubation in response to green manure (GM); GM with 20 and 40 t/ha (tonne per hectare) farmyard manure (FYM) compost (C20 and C40); and GM with 1 and 2 t/ha of commercial organic fertilizer (CF1 and CF2).

The second season crops lettuce, turnip, and carrot treated with C40 produced higher yields compared with all other treatments. Most of the commercial fertilizer was mineralized or oxidized during the previous crop.

Swiss chard, grown in 54 days, produced higher yield with CF2 treatment compared with C40. Continuous compost and GM application increased N availability and compost mineralized N recovery during longer growing season for potatoes (124 days), and short growing season for cabbage (56 days).

These findings indicate that the fast nitrogen release of commercial fertilizers increased the yield of the first crop of the year, but the slowly released nitrogen of farmyard manure compost increased the yield of both crops of the year, plus a lower risk of soil nitrogen loss.

Nitrogen-rich fertilizers

Plants thrive in nutrient-rich soil, and nitrogen is an important component in growing plants. Here are some of the best natural fertilizers with high nitrogen content:

  1. Alfalfa pellets — Alfalfa is chopped and pressed into small pellets, with each little pellet releasing the nutrients slowly over a few weeks to months. They act as a natural slow release fertilization program for plants that need an extra boost.
  2. Bat guano — Bat excrement is a nitrogen-rich fertilizer that works well when mixed with sawdust or other wood product. Bat guano is highly concentrated, so a little bit goes a long way.
  3. Blood meal — This is another high-nitrogen fertilizer that you can get from your local abattoir. It is usually dried and purchased as a dark red powder. This is usually used for crops that require a rich soil or added to slow compost as an activator. Note that the smell of blood meal can attract wildlife or your neighbors’ pets.
  4. Chicken manure — This fertilizer is readily obtainable, especially if you have backyard chickens. Used judiciously, composted well with the deep litter of the chicken house, this is one of the absolute best of all high nitrogen fertilizers. Note that chicken manure can be extremely hot in the first stages of decomposition, and can burn tender seedlings with both the heat of decomposition and the salts that it contains.
  5. Compost tea — Add a couple of shovels full of compost to a nylon stocking, and steep it in a large water-filled bin. Stir it daily for a week or two and dilute before using. Avoid using compost tea on leafy green crops that you will eat raw, as it can be a source of E. coli or other bacteria that can cause digestive problems. (Related: 8 ways to make healthy organic soil for your garden.)
  6. Horse manure — One of the best natural fertilizers, horse manure contains a good percentage of smaller particles that can add valuable organic matter to the soil.

Did you know that fish emulsion is another nitrogen-rich organic fertilizer? Learn more about different kinds of organic fertilizers and their effects on crop yields at GreenLivingNews.com.

Sources include:

Science.news

TandFOnline.com

O-Garden.ca

HobbyFarms.com

Soils treated with organic fertilizer are healthier; produce stronger plants

Natural News
13 November 2018
Janine Acero

(Natural News) Come to any local gardening center and you may see rows and rows of plant- and animal-based fertilizers that boast of faster growth, beautiful blooms, or abundant produce from your plants. But which type of fertilizer can actually deliver these promises?

A study published in the journal Biological Agriculture & Horticulture assessed the effect of plant- and animal-based soil amendmentsin the overall quality of organic produce.

The researchers investigated the influence of plant- and animal-based fertilizers on organic matter content, soil respiration, crop yield, and phytochemical content of globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus) heads. The researchers used one plant-based and three animal-based certified organic fertilizers as experimental treatments:

  • alfalfa meal
  • blood meal
  • chicken manure
  • fish meal

The research team assessed and compared the soil respiration and organic matter content of soil with plant-based amendments (alfalfa meal) and soil treated with animal-based fertilizers (blood meal, chicken manure, and fish meal).

After two years, researchers found soil respiration and organic matter content to be higher in soil with plant-based treatments than soil with animal-based amendments. In addition, artichoke heads grown in alfalfa-treated soil were also found to have higher concentrations of phytochemicals than those grown in soil with animal-based fertilizers. The downside is that the cost of the alfalfa meal was higher than that of the animal-based treatments. (Related: Organic fertilizers made with moringa promote the healthier growth of wheat.)

In terms of crop yield, those from soil treated with chicken manure was higher compared with alfalfa-treated soil. In the first year of the study, yields from both chicken manure and fish meal treatments were higher than the alfalfa treatment.

These findings suggest that plant-based soil amendments can be an ideal choice for improving soil quality and phytochemical content of crops, but for organic farmers whose main concerns are crop yield and overall cost, animal-based fertilizers may be the ideal option.

Vegan organic fertilizers

The best way to ensure that you have the best fertilizers for your plants is to make them yourself. The following list features some vegan organic fertilizers that you can easily make in your own backyard:

  • Compost — A compost pile is a staple in any good garden, if you have the space. A good compost pile is full of nutrients, nitrogen and beneficial microorganisms that keep your garden healthy. Making your own compost pile also encourages a healthy population of worms which is another benefit for your plants.
  • Hay mulches — Mulching is simply covering the ground with layers of organic material. Mulching will add nutrients to the soil as it decomposes, and will also suppress weeds and encourage worms in your garden. You can apply mulch while your garden is on a break for the winter, or you can do it while your plants are growing, as long as you don’t overwhelm your plants.
  • Liquid fertilizers — You can make liquid fertilizers with comfrey or nettles and other composting plants. These fertilizers are an excellent source of nitrogen. Treat your garden with some wonderful liquid fertilizer with this quick guide and an advanced method of making your own compost tea out of nettle.
  • Worm castings — Worm castings improve the soil and increase your garden’s fertility. Purchasing them from a store sure is the easier option, but it can be harmful to the worms being cultivated for the product. You can encourage a natural worm population by simply providing the right environment for them to thrive in. You can do this by providing a cool, damp and dark environment with plenty of nutrients for them to enjoy, such as a compost pile or hay mulch.

Learn more about the various factors that affect crop yields at Harvest.news.

Sources include:

Teaching children to grow their own food greatly reduces obesity, study finds

Natural News
28 August 2018
Russel Davis

(Natural News) Teaching children the basics of gardening and food production may stem childhood obesity, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior. To carry out the study, a team of researchers from the University of California, Davis examined more than 400 children aged nine to 10 years old at four schools in California. The children were stratified into two groups: one that received gardening lessons, and the control group.

The study was conducted under the Shaping Healthy Choices Programme, which instructed children to grow and harvest their own vegetables. The produce were then used in cooking demonstrations or were taken home. The school canteens were also instructed to use produce grown from the gardens, which were then featured in newsletters that were sent home to the children’s families.

According to the study, children who enrolled in a gardening class were more likely to shed pounds within a year. The research team also found that schools with gardening classes had lower proportion of obese students. The researchers inferred that gardening lessons may help curb obesity in children by teaching them about healthy foods such as fresh vegetables.

“The BMI and waist-to-height ratio were greatly improved in intervention groups, with the overweight or obese population declining from 55.6 to 37.8 percent at the Northern California intervention school. The dramatic decrease in BMI, although unexpected in this short time frame, demonstrated that the SHCP was effective due to positive health messages and reinforcing nutrition concepts throughout the school and home environments,” said lead author Dr Rachel Scherr in Daily Mail.

Studies show the importance of gardening against childhood obesity

A 2013 study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine revealed that a community gardening initiative resulted in a significant decrease in obesity rates among low-income Hispanic American children. The intervention, called Growing Healthy Kids Program, involved a weekly gardening session, a seven-week cooking and nutrition workshop, and social events for both children and parents. As part of the study, the researchers assessed pre- and post-program height and weight data from 95 children aged two to 15 years.

The research team found that 17 percent of overweight and obese children attained significant improvements in BMI classification. The study also revealed that 100 percent of children with a normal BMI at the start of the study were able to maintain their weight after the initiative. In addition, the availability of fresh fruits and vegetables grew by 146 percent following the gardening program. Furthermore, the researchers noted an increase in the children’s fruit and vegetable consumption.

“Findings from this pilot study are consistent with previous studies reporting an increase in availability and consumption of fruits and vegetables among families participating in community gardens. Although there are limitations because this is a pilot study, this strategy seems to be promising for addressing childhood obesity, particularly among low-income Latino immigrant families,” the researchers wrote.

In another study, researchers found that lack of access to gardens may increase the odds of childhood obesity. To carry out the study, a team of researchers from the VU UniversityMedical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands pooled data from the Millennium Cohort Study with a total cohort population of 19,000 children. The research team found that children who did not have an access to gardens between the ages five and seven years were 38 percent more likely to become obese by age seven. Living in a disadvantaged neighborhood and having a lower educated household were also found to raise the odds of childhood obesity. The researchers also noted that children belonging to higher educated households living in disadvantaged neighborhood were still at an increased risk of childhood obesity.

The findings were presented at the annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes.

Sources include:

Vertical Farming, Hydroponics & Aquaponics Solutions for the Grand Solar Minimum

Searching for solutions to the Grand Solar Minimum particularly for indoor vertical agriculture, I visited Rob Virgin from Taiwan Hydroponics the developer of the Vertical Hydroponic Grow Tube System. We also went to Home Aquaponics an open to the public test facility for all things aeroponic and aquaponic. Let me take you through a tour of the future of agriculture.