Category Archives: Spying

Social Engineering: China wants to give all of its citizens a score – and their rating could affect every area of their lives

Main Source: Independent UK
Date: 23 October 2016
Author: Simon Denyer: New Report Beijing

Imagine a world where an authoritarian government monitors everything you do, amasses huge amounts of data on almost every interaction you make, and awards you a single score that measures how “trustworthy” you are.

In this world, anything from defaulting on a loan to criticising the ruling party, from running a red light to failing to care for your parents properly, could cause you to lose points. And in this world, your score becomes the ultimate truth of who you are – determining whether you can borrow money, get your children into the best schools or travel abroad; whether you get a room in a fancy hotel, a seat in a top restaurant – or even just get a date. Continue reading Social Engineering: China wants to give all of its citizens a score – and their rating could affect every area of their lives

First They Came For the iPhones…

Source: Infowars
Date: 29 February 2016
Author: Ron Paul

Government spying on us has not prevented one terrorist attack

The FBI tells us that its demand for a back door into the iPhone is all about fighting terrorism, and that it is essential to break in just this one time to find out more about the San Bernardino attack last December. Continue reading First They Came For the iPhones…

Kim Dotcom Addresses NZ PM in Parliament Arguing Against Extension of GCSB Powers (FULL SPEECH)

Kim Dotcom, whose extradition battle is continuing, spoke to Parliament’s Intelligence and Security Select Committee today — arguing against the extension of the GCSB’s powers.

“The new GCSB bill demands an expansion of spying powers. This is poorly timed,” he said.

Mr Dotcom received a formal apology from Prime Minister John Key after it was revealed the GCSB spied on him illegally. Addressing the committee, he called his fight “an injustice” and said he believed more New Zealanders had received the spy agency’s attention.

“I suspect the real scope of the spying by the GCSB is bigger than what we know today,” he said.

Mr Dotcom argued against the outsourcing of the agency’s powers, but Mr Key claimed it made sense and followed Mr Dotcom’s business model with MegaUpload.

“We cannot value human rights if we hand our information to a spy cloud.”

Mr Dotcom and associate Bram van der Kolk’s submission the proposed Bill was a “clear example of the type of state intelligence agency overreach”.

They went on to say spying on New Zealanders is unwarranted without safeguards and the proposed expansion of the GCSB aren’t justified. The submission says the passage of the Bill has been “unduly hasty”.

“We believe more time should be taken for public debate and inquiry before this Bill is passed.”

Earlier, former Green Party MP Keith Locke – who has previously claimed to have been spied upon by the Security Intelligence Service – told the select committee the GCSB spied on Chile and Mexico to help America in the lead-up to the Iraq War.

Mr Locke is arguing for more transparency from the Government’s spy agency.

“The Government can’t just continue to hide behind the smokescreen that I saw during the 12 years I was in Parliament,” he said.

Vikram Kumar, the former head of Internet New Zealand, knows the GCSB’s role well — having worked alongside the agency several times.

“I have been very impressed with their professionalism, with their hard work and with the constraints in which they operate,” he said, “Expanding the role of GCSB, particularly to economic well-being, is troubling.”

Mr Kumar says the reason behind this is the term “economic well-being” could refer to a number of things, and a shortage of skilled staff in New Zealand.

“The GCSB mindset is essentially a spying mindset, because that’s what they are […] and now we are trying to make them into a police mindset,” he said.

“We will be operating in an environment of suspicion, just as we see and in fact I’d say worse, than what we see in the US.”

Internet New Zealand’s Jordan Carter and Susan Chalmers spoke to the committee together. Mr Carter spoke of his concern any changes may have in the years to come.

“It needs to deal with people with less good motives and power in the future.”

Ms Chalmers was one of many submitters who spoke on the issue of metadata.

Metadata is data which provides information about one or more aspects of data. A common example is a digital photograph, which can show how large it is, when it was taken, where it was taken and other data.

“Metadata in many situations could actually be more revealing than the actual conversations themselves,” she said.
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Customs wants power to demand passwords

Source: Wake Up NZ Also on the NZ Ecoliberty site
Date: April 14, 2014

In the latest push towards a big brother state, the New Zealand Customs is requesting the power to demand traveler’s laptop and smartphone passwords without a warrant while going through border security. The suggested punishment for not complying? 3 months imprisonment.

The reasoning behind such an invasive law change is to help in the detection of objectionable material, evidence of offending, evidence of links to terrorism or to confirm travel plans. Currently under the Customs and Excise Act, Customs have the power to access smartphones and laptops only after getting a warrant, while under normal circumstances travelers are not legally obliged to provide a password or encryption key. Continue reading Customs wants power to demand passwords

‘Incredibly intrusive’: Windows 10 spies on you by default

Source:RT
Date: 1 August 2015
Author: Unknown

Microsoft’s new Windows 10 operating system is immensely popular, with 14 million downloads in just two days. The price of the free upgrade may just be your privacy, though, as changing Windows 10’s intrusive default settings is difficult.

Technology journalists and bloggers are singing Windows 10’s praises, often using the words such as “amazing,”“glorious” and “fantastic.” The operating system has been described as faster, smoother and more user-friendly than any previous version of Windows. According to Wired magazine, more than 14 million people have downloaded their upgrade since the system was released on Wednesday.

While the upgrade is currently free of charge to owners of licensed copies of Windows 8 and Windows 7, it does come at a price. Several tech bloggers have warned that the privacy settings in the operating system are invasive by default, and that changing them involves over a dozen different screens and an external website. Continue reading ‘Incredibly intrusive’: Windows 10 spies on you by default

Leaked papers reveal NZ plan to spy on China for US

NZ Herald
April 19, 2015

The revelation has sparked a firm Chinese diplomatic response giving rise to concerns NZ's security relationship with the US is impacting its trade relationship with China. Photo / Mark Mitchell The revelation has sparked a firm Chinese diplomatic response giving rise to concerns NZ’s security relationship with the US is impacting its trade relationship with China.

Our spies and America’s top government hackers cooked up a plan to crack into a data link between Chinese Government buildings in Auckland, new Edward Snowden documents reveal.The project appeared aimed at tapping data flowing between the Chinese consulate and its passport office in Great South Rd — and using the link to access China’s computer systems.

The revelation is the most explosive of the information about New Zealand revealed in the Snowden documents — and has sparked a firm Chinese diplomatic response giving rise to concerns our security relationship with the United States is impacting our trade relationship with China. Continue reading Leaked papers reveal NZ plan to spy on China for US

Facebook still tracks users after unplugging from network

Facebook is once again under scrutiny over its privacy protocols, this time after apparently violating European laws by tracking users’ internet activity after they have logged out of the website. The tactic, known as frictionless sharing, tracks users’ activities on the web and shares it with other companies. Ben Swann talks to legal analyst and media personality Michael Lebron, better known as ‘Lionel,’ to get further insight into the report.

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